Election Day was Tuesday, Democrats took the house, Republicans gained seats in the Senate and we likely hit a historic number of voters for this year’s midterm election.

People across the country were undoubtedly more concerned and more passionate. In fact, nearly half of all eligible voters (47%) showed up to cast their ballots this week. This is a sizable increase from both 2014 (36.7%) and 2010 (41%).

As marketers, we can learn not only from the outcomes of this record breaking election, but also from undercurrents that have made their way to the surface our of our society. Here are five things that happened leading up where we are today.

As marketers, we can learn not only from the outcomes of this record breaking election, but also from undercurrents that have made their way to the surface our of our society.Click To Tweet
  1. Epic spending on advertising.

Various sources report that dollars spent on political advertising broke a new record to the point that money was no object. This may not be surprising given the more competitive races, a divisive climate and an outcome with big consequences.

  1. Diverse candidates emerge in opposition of Trump.

This election brought a wave of more diverse and first-time candidates, many of them Democrats. Records were broken with 260 female candidates and 195 people of color running for office. PBS reports that these candidates “had a wide range of reasons for running, but there seemed to be one unifying theme, at least among left-leaning candidates: opposition to Trump.”

  1. Negative and racist advertising.

According to the Wesleyan Media Project, the number of negative ads increase by 61% percent when compared to 2014. And according to a story from USA TODAY, the number of racially divisive ads was “jarring.” Princeton University Profession, Kevin Kruse stated that “the new surge in nakedly racist appeals shows that, for a segment of the country at least, racism is no longer anything to be ashamed of.”

Racist robocalls impersonating Oprah targeting Stacey Abrams, were just some of the grossly discriminatory tactics used this go-around. Many cite that Trump has made this type of rhetoric acceptable.

  1. Celebrity and Grassroot Involvement

Survivors of the Parkland, Florida shooting launched a nationwide campaign called Road to Change aimed at driving voter register and with great success in many states.

More than 50 actors, comedians and YouTube stars joined a two-hour, live-streamed telethon to incite young voters.

And let’s not forget Tay Tay…Taylor Swift broke her political silence and urged her 112 million Instagram followers to vote. She was credited with the massive increase in voter registration in her home state of Tennessee

  1. Wave of young voters takes action.

According to an estimate by the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement at Tufts University, 31 percent of voters aged 18 to 29 cast their votes and crushed turnout rates from the past 25 years. Initial analysis shows overwhelming support for Democratic candidates.

For more insights on communication and brand strategy, industry trends and more, subscribe today to the Weekly Buzz here.